Northwestern University Bulletin: The School of Law for the 1942 Summer Session
1942 March 23

Northwestern University Bulletin: The School of Law for the 1942 Summer Session

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Description: This special Bulletin (vol. XLII, no. 22) provides information on the 1942 summer session.

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Bulletins
1942
Summer Session
1942 March 23

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NORTHWESTERN
UNIVERSITY BULLETIN
VOLUME XLII MARCH 23, 1942 NUMBER 22
THE SCHOOL OF LAW
for the
1942 SUMMER SESSION
LAKE SHORE DRIVE AND CHICAGO AVENUE • CHICAGO
Northwestern University Bulletin is published by
Northwestern University weekly during the academic
year at 301 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago,
Illinois. Entered as second-class mail matter November
21, 1913, at the post office at Chicago,
Illinois, under Act of Congress of August 24,
1912, acceptance for mailing at special rate of
postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October
3, 1917, authorized on June 14, 1918.
THE SCHOOL OF LAW
SUMMER SESSION
LEON GREEN, M.A., LL.B., LL.D., Dean
FACULTY
Resident Members
LEON GREEN, M.A., LL.B., LL.D., Dean and Professor of Law
HAROLD CANFIELD HAVIGHURsT, M.A., LL.B., Professor of Law
HoMER F. CAREY, M.A., LL.B., Professor of Law
NELLIE MACNAMARA, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Law
STEPHEN LovE, LL.B., Professor of Law
WALTER FAIRLEIGH DoDD, A.B., B.S., Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Law
IRVING GOLDSTEIN, LL.B., Instructor in Trial Technique
PAUL ZIFFREN, B.S., J.D., Lecturer in Taxation/
ENTRANCE TO LEVY MAYER HALL
Northwestern University School of Law
r
SUMMER SESSION, 1942
THE SUMMER SESSION will be held from June 15 to August 22, inclusive.
The first term ends July 18; the second term begins July 20.
ADMISSION
An applicant for admission as a regular student ( a candidate for a degree)
must make formal application for admission as required in the regular session.
Any applicant in good standing at a member school of the Association of
American Law Schools will be admitted to the Summer Session. An applicant
from another law school who enters only for the summer should present a certificate
of good standing at the time of his matriculation.
DEGREES
Degree of Juris Doctor (J. D.) . The degree of Juris Doctor is conferred upon a
student who has successfully completed seven years of college and Jaw-school work.
If a student is admitted upon the basis of a college degree, he may earn the degree
of Juris Doctor by three years ( eighty-four semester-hours) of study in the School
of Law. If he is admitted upon a basis of three years (ninety semester-hours) of
college work, he may earn the law degree by four years ( 104 semester-hours)
of study in the School of Law.
Degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.). The degree of Bachelor of Laws is conferred
upon a student who has successfully completed five or six years of college
and law-school work-two or three years (a minimum of sixty semester-hours) of
college and three years (eighty-four semester-hours) of law study.
For information about other degrees and about detailed regulations, see
Announcement of the School of Law, 1942-43.
FEES
Students entering for the first time, and for the Summer Session only, are required
to pay a matriculation fee of five dollars. Those who remain for the regular
session are required to pay an additional five dollars.
The full-time (six or more credit-hours) fee is one hundred dollars; part-time
(three to five credit-hours), fifty dollars; part-time (one or two credit-hours),
twenty dollars a credit-hour.
Fees for auditing are on the same basis.
DESCRIPTION OF COURSES
( One summer-session hour for a single term equals one-third semester-hour of
credit; one hour for the full session, two-thirds semester-hours. Thus, a six-hour
course for one term equals two hours of credit; a three-hour course for the full
session equals two hours of credit).
FIRST TERM
BUSINESS AGENCIES III (Bankruptcy)
Six hours a week. A study of systems by which insolvent enterprises are
administered for the benefit of creditors, including a study of liquidation under
general assignment, equity receivership, and bankruptcy, and of reorganization
and financial rehabilitation by means of equity receivership and bankruptcy.
Mr. Carey.
CIVIL CLINIC
Three hours a week.
Mr. Love and Miss MacNamara.
CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
Seven hours a week (both terms). Internal relations within the Federal State;
relations of the Federal State to persons and property subject to constitutional
restrictions; control of the Supreme Court over Federal and state legislation.
Mr. Dodd.
CRIMINAL LAW
Seven hours a week (both terms) . A study of the substantive criminal law:
criminal intent, defenses, insanity, mistake, statutory crimes, attempt, and various
specific offenses.
Mr. Goldstein.
DAMAGES
Three hours a week (both terms). The measurement of damages, with special
emphasis upon the application of the standards of value and certainty, and
upon the procedural aspects of damage litigation, such as the preparation for
trial of the damage issue, and the functions of judge and jury in the ascertainment
of amount.
Mr. Green.
NEGOTIABLE INSTRUMENTS
Six hours a week. Anglo-American law of bills of exchange, promissory notes,
checks, negotiable bonds, and similar instruments; Negotiable Instruments Act.
M.r. Havighurst.
RELATIONS
Three hours a week (both terms). The protection, legal and equitable, given
interests in relations with others: family relations, social relations, professional
relations, political relations, trade relations, labor r elations, and abuses of
governmental processes.
Mr. Green.
TAXATION II
Six hours a week. The federal income tax; miscellaneous taxes.
Mr. Ziffren.
SECOND TERM
CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
Seven hours a week. Continuation from first term.
M r. Dodd.
CRIMINAL LAW
Seven hours a week. Continuation from first term.
Mr. Goldstein.
DAMAGES
Three hours a week. Continuation from first term.
Mr. Green.
EQUITY III
Six hours a week. Reformation, Rescission, and Restitution, at law (Quasi-
Contracts) and in equity. A study of common law and equitable remedies in
cases of misrepresentation and nondisclosure, mistake of fact, and mistake
of law.
Mr. Carey.
INSURANCE
Six hours a week. The function and theory of insurance; the rights and
powers of the insurer, the insured, and beneficiaries under life, accident, and
property insurance contracts.
Mr. Havighurst.
RELATIONS
Three hours a week. Continuation from first term.
Mr. Green.
TRIAL TECHNIQUE
Three hours a week. The study is devoted primarily to methods of proof,
including preparation of the facts, direct examination, laying the foundation
for and the introduction of exhibits, objections to evidence, offers of proof,
expert testimony, hypothetical questions, cross examination and impeachment
of witnesses, and arguments to court and jury. The illustrative material is
from records of cases tried in the various courts.
Mr. Goldstein.
“Northwestern University Bulletin: The School of Law for the 1942 Summer Session,” PLRC Collections, accessed November 16, 2019, http://plrccollections.org/items/show/423.