Northwestern University Law School Circular of Information for 1898-99
1898-1899

Northwestern University Law School Circular of Information for 1898-99

About This Item

Description: This issue was part of an early series of bulletins whose title was likely a carry-on from the days of the Union College of Law Circular of Information.

Dublin Core

Bulletins
1898-1899
1898-1899

Scripto

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
LAW SCHOOL
MASONIC TEMPLE
CHICAGO, - ILLINOIS
CIRCULAR OF INFORMATION
FoR 1898-99
JUNE, 1898

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
I_JA W SCHOOL
MASONIC TEMPLE, CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.
CALENDAR.
1898.
September 22, Thursday,
November 24, Thursday,
December 22, Thursday,
First Semester Begins.
Thanksgiving Recess.
Christmas Recess Begins.
1899.
January 4,
January 30,
February 4,
February 6,
February 22,
May 25,
June 15,
Wednesday, Christmas Recess Ends.
Monday, Examinations Begin.
Saturday, First Semester Ends.
Monday, Second Semester Begins.
Wednesday, Washington's Birthday.
Thursday, Examinations Begin.
Thursday, Commencement.
2
"Resolved, That the American Bar Association is of the opm10n
that before a student commences the study of law, it is desirable
that he should have received a general education at least equivalent
to a high school course, and that persons who have not completed
the equivalent of such a course should not be admitted into law
schools as candidates for a degree."-From tl,e Proceeding·s qj tl,e
American Bar A ssociation for r897, p. 33.
"Resolved, That the American Bar Association approves the
lengthening of the course of instruction in law schools to a period
of three years, and that it expresses the hope that as soon as practicable
a rule m ay be adopted in each state, which will require ca ndidates
for admission to the bar to study law for three years before
applying for admission."-From t!te Proceeding s ef tl,e Amer ican B ar
Association for r897, p. 31 .
"Of those examined in New York who had had training in a law
school, 14 per cent. failed to pass, while of those who had not attended
a law school, 26 per cent. failed to pass."-Austen G. Fox, qj
t!te N. r. State Board of Law E xaminers.
"It is now generally believed that the law school a nd not th e
office is the place to obtain a legal education ."- From tl,e P roceedmgs
qj tlte American Bar Association for r897, p. 362.
"As an early product of a law school, I have always been a firm
believer in schools of that kind which are of the right class. There
are but few who are qualified by nature for teaching, and the busy
lawyer has but little time and generally no adaptation for the occupation
of an instructor. In the law schools are to be found those
who have the qualities of teachers and are able to direct the study
of their pupils to the best results."-'.fudge '.fames H. Cm-twrig ltt ,
S upreme Court of Illinois, in Clticago L egal N ews, May r4, r898.
3
TRUSTEES OF THE UNIVERSITY.
WILLIAM DEERING,
President ef the Board.
OLIVER HARVEY HORTON, LL.D.,
First Vice-President.
H. H. C. MILLER,
Second Vice-President.
FRANK PHILIP CRANDON, A.M.,
Secretary.
EDMUND ANDREWS, M.D., LL.D.
JOSEPH FLINTOFT BERRY, D.D.
FRANK MILTON BRISTOL, D.D.
JOHN PATRICK BRUSHINGHAM, D.D.
CHARLES BUSBY.
LORIN CONE COLLINS, JR., A.M .
CHARLES BOWEN CONGDON.
ALFRED EDWIN CRAIG,
DEBORAH H. CUMMINGS.
NATHAN SMITH DAVIS, M.D., LLD.
NATHAN SMITH DAVIS, JR ., M.D.
JOHN WESLEY DOANE.
WILLIAM A. DYCHE.
ARTHUR EDWARDS.
*JOHN EVANS, M.D .
GEORGE HENRY FOSTER.
WILLIAM ALDEN FULLER.
HENRY HOWARD GAGE,
LYMAN JUDSON GAGE.
ELBERT HENRY GARY.
JAMES WILLIAM HANEY, A.M., D.D.
RICHARD HANEY, D.D.
NORMAN WAITE HARRIS.
GEORGE S. HICKEY.
HARLOW NILES HIGINBOTHAM .
THOMAS CLARKSON HOAG,
JAMES BARTLETT HOBBS.
JOHN BALDERSTON KIRK.
JOHN RICHARD LINDGREN.
CORNELIA GRAY LUNT .
DAVID MCWILLIAMS,
FRANK WARREN MERRELL, PH.D,
H. H. C. MILLER, A.M.
JOSIAH J . PARKHURST.
AMOS WILLIAMS PATTEN, D.D,
JAMES HENRY RAYMOND, A.M.
ALEXANDER HAMILTON REVELL.
HENRY WADE ROGERS, LL.D .
GUSTAVUS FRANKLIN SWIFT.
HENRY SARGEANT TOWLE, LL.B.
MILTON HOLIDAY WILSON.
*Deceased.
4
/
FACULTY.
HENRY WADE ROGERS,
(A.M., University of Michigan; LL.D., Wesleyan University
President of the University.
HON . PETER STENGER GROSSCUP,
(A.M., Wittenberg College; LL.B., Boston University; LL.D., Knox and Wit·
tenberg Colleges; Judge of U.S. District Court)
Dean and Professor of Law.
HARVEY BOSTWICK HURD,
(LL.D., Northwestern University)
Professor of Law.
EDWARD AVERY HARRIMAN,
(A.B., Harvard University; LL.B., Boston University)
Professor of Law.
JOHN HENRY WIGMORE,
(A.M., Harvard University; LL.B., Harvard University)
Professor of Law.
BLEWETT LEE,
(A.M., Harvard University; LL.B., Harvard University)
Professor of Law.
EDWIN BURRITT SMITH,
(A.M., Oberlin University; LL.M., Yale University)
Professor of Law.
JULIAN WILLIAM MACK,
(LL.B., Harvard University)
Professor of Law.
HON. NATHANIEL CLINTON SEARS,
(A.M., Amherst College; Judge of the Appellate Court, First District of Illinois)
Professor of Practice.
LESTER LE GRAND BOND,
Lecturer on Trade Marks and Copyrights.
5

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
LAW SCHOOL.
MASONIC TEMPLE, CHICAGO.
ANNOUNCEMENT.
Northwestern University comprises the following degreeconferring
departments, each having a distinct Faculty of
Instruction:
THE COLLE GE OF LIBERAL ARTS,
THE MEDICAL SCHOOL,
THE LA w SCHOOL,
THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY,
THE DENTAL SCHOOL,
THE WOMAN' S MEDICAL SCHOOL,
THE ScHOOL OF Mus rc,
THE SCHOOL OF THOLOGY.
The departments of the University are established in
Chicago and Evanston, Illinois. The professional schools
of Medicine, Law, Pharmacy, and Dentistry were established
in the former place because of the advantages which a great
city affords to those engaged in professional study. The
College of Liber:;il Arts was established in Evanston because
of the advantages to be derived from carrying on undergraduate
study in a place somewhat removed from the distractions
of a large city.
The Law School was founded in 1859, there being at the
time but three similar schools west of the Allegheny Mountains.
For a long time it was known as the Union College of
Law, but in 1891 it assumed its present name.
7
8 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY.
The Law School offers to students a thorough training
in the fundamental subjects of the law. Its students come
from all parts of the country, and its course is arranged
with a view to giving students that knowledge of the law
which will be indispensable to them wherever they may
practice. Special opportunities, however, are afforded for acquiring
a knowledge of the law of Illinois.
Law students are admitted without charge to courses in
the College of Liberal Arts. The consent of both faculties
must be obtained, however, and not more than one subject
may be taken in the college each year.
SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS .
The rooms of the school are in the Masonic Temple. The
lecture hall, library and reading-room, students' room and
offices are spacious and conveniently arranged. The building
is centrally located, and is only two blocks from the Court
House.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION.
Persons applying for admission in 1898-99 and thereafter
as regular students must answer the following requirements:
1. Age.-They must be not less than eighteen years of age.
2. Preliminary Edttcatio11.-A candidate for a degree must have
a preliminary general education equivalent to that of a graduate of a
high school. For the proof of such education required se_e page 30.
3. Time of Entrance.-No applicant not coming from another
law school will be admitted to the first-year class after the second
week in January. This is because the courses of study are carefully
graded and an acquaintance with earlier courses is necessary
for the pursuit of the later ones. Those who do not enter by the
beginning of January cannot work with profit to themselves, and
are a hindrance to the progress of others. All students intending
to enter the school are strongly urged to do so at the beginning of
the year. The disadvantage of delay is great, especially to students
who intend to practice law in Illinois.
THE LAW SCHOOL. 9
ADVANCED STANDING.
Persons will hereafter be admitted to advanced standing
upon the following conditions:
I. As candidates for graduation in one year.
(a) Persons who produce certificates from other law schools
or colleges, in good standing, of having satisfactorily pursued courses
of legal study amounting to at least forty term-hours, or ten hours
a week for two years.
(b) Persons who produce certificates from other law schools or
colleges, in good standing, of having satisfactorily pursued courses
of legal study amounting to at least twenty term-hours, or ten
hours a week for one year, and who have also studied law under
the direction of an attorney for an additional period of one year, of
at least thirty-six weeks, as shown by a certificate of the attorney,
stating the time spent in study, the books read, and the frequency
of the examination of the student by the attorney.
II. As candidates for graduation in two years.
(a) Persons who produce certificates from other law schools
or colleges, in good standing, of having satisfactorily pursued courses
of legal study amounting to at least twenty term-hours, or ten houn
a week for one year.
(b) Persons who have studied law under the direction of an
attorney for at least thirty-six weeks, as shown by a certificate of
the attorney stating the time spent in study, the books read, and the
frequency of the examination of the student by the attorney.
(c) Graduates of colleges, in good standing, who produce certificates
of having satisfactorily pursued courses of legal study
amounting to at least ten term-hours, or ten hours a week for half
a year.
III. As candidates for graduation in three years.
Persons who produce certificates of credit from other law schools
or colleges, in good standing, to a less amount than is required in
Rule II.
IV. Students who have graduated from the College of
Liberal Arts of this University prior to entering on their work
in this Law School, or who have graduated from a College of
Liberal Arts of some other University whose requirements for
IO NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY.
graduation appear to this Faculty to be equivalent to those of
this University for the same degrees, may be admitted to advanced
standing in this Law School, and may be given credit
for certain work in law done in such College of Liberal Arts,
the total credit for the same not to exceed two term-hours in
any one subject, nor to exceed ten term-hours in all. The
subjects for which such credit may be obtained are the follow -
ing: Constitutional Law, International Law, Elementary Law,
Roman Law, Administrative Law, Comparative Constitutional
Law.
Where credit is thus obtained in any of the above-named
subjects, the student will not be permitted to obtain additional
credit in any such subjects by pursuing the same
studies in the Law School, except for the excess of the number
of hours in the Law School course over the number of hours
for which credit in any subject is given. Students who enter
this school with ten term-hours of credit thus obtained are
thereby enabled to arrange their law work so as to make it
possible for them to obtain the degree of Bachelor of Law in
two years.
V. Students admitted to advanced standing will receive
degrees and diplomas upon the same terms as those who
enter at the beginning of the course. That is to say, such
students must obtain credit on the books of this school for the
amount of work required for the diploma or degree. Such
credit will be given to students coming from other colleges or
law schools for an amount of work equivalent, in the opinion
of the Faculty, to that for which they have received credit in
such other schools. No credit is given in any other way for
work done outside this school, and the student admitted to
advanced standing must therefore pass the regular examinations
in those courses in which he does not come with credit
from other schools or colleges.
THE LAW SCHOOL. I I
SPECIAL STUDENTS.
There are two classes of special students, those who are
candidates for a degree and those who are not.
Persons not desiring to be candidates for a degree may
pursue one or more courses as special students, provided they
are qualified to pursue such courses to advantage. They will
receive a certificate of all work done, and they may at any
time enter as candidates for a degree, provided they are qualified
under the above requirements. Persons who are candidates
for a degree, but who for some reason take other than
the regular work of any given year, are registered as special
students, candidates for a degree.
COURSE OF INSTRUCTION.
FIRST YEAR.
FIRST TERM.
Contracts-Three hours a week. Langdell and Williston's Cases
on Contracts. Woodruff's Cases on Domestic Relations. Harriman
on Contracts. Professor HARRIMAN.
Torts-Two hours a week. Ames and Smith's Cases on Torts.
\Voodruff's Cases on Domestic Relations. Professor WIGMORE.
Real Property (A)-Two hours a week. Tiedeman's Text and
Cases on Real Property. Professor SMITH.
Common Law Pleading-Two hours a week. Perry on Pleading.
Professor HURD.
Procedure-One hour a week. Professor HURD.
SECOND TERM.
Contracts (continued)-Three hours a week.
Professor HARRIMAN.
Torts (continued)-Three hours a week. Professor ·WIGMORE.
Real Property (A) (continued)-One hour a week.
Professor SMITH.
Ba,7ments and Carriers-Two hours a week. McClain's Cases on
Carriers. Professor WIGMORE.
Domestic Relations-One hour a week. Woodruff's Cases on
Domestic Relations. Professor WIGMORE.
Personal Property-One hour a week. Professor HURD.
12 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY.
SECOND YEAR.
FIRST TERM,
Evidence-Two hours a week. Thayer's Cases on Evidence.
Professor WIGMORE.
Trusts-Three hours a week. Ames' Cases on Trusts.
Agency-Two hours a week.
Professor MACK.
vVambaugh's Cases on Agency.
Huffcut on Agency. Professor HARRIMAN.
Real Property (B)-Two hours a week.
Commercial Paper-Two hours a week.
ble Instruments.
Professor SMITH.
H uffcut on N egotia-
Professor MACK.
~uasi-Confracts-Two hours a week. Selections from Keener's
Cases on Quasi-Contracts. Professor WIGMORE.
SECOND TERM,
Evidence (continued)-Two hours a week.
Professor WIGMORE.
Property (B) (continued)-One hour a week.
Professor SMITH.
Commercial Paper (continued)-One hour a week.
Professor MACK.
Equity-Three hours a week. Keener's Cases on Equity.
Professor LEE.
Sales-Three hours a week. Williston's Cases on Sales.
Professor MACK.
Criminal Law-One hour a week. May on Criminal Law.
Professor HURD.
Wills and Administration-One hour a week. Bigelow on Wills.
Professor SMITH.
THIRD YEAR.
FIRST TERM,
International Law, Public and Private-Two hours a week.
Judge GROSSCUP.
Partnership-Two hours a week. Ames' Cases on Partnership.
Pollock's Digest of Partnership (1895.) Professor HARRIMAN.
Constitutional Law-Three hours a week. Thayer's Cases on
Con~titutional Law. Professor LEE.
Corporations, Public and Private-One hour a week. Jeremiah
Smith's Cases on Corporations. Professor HARRIMAN.
Common Practice-(At common law and in equity). Two hours a
week, Judge SEARS.
THE LAW SCHOOL. 13
SECOND TERM.
Suretyshij,-One hour a week. Ames' Cases on Suretyship.
Professor LEE.
Corporations (continued)-Three hours a week.
Professor HARRIMAN.
Common Law Practice (continued)-Two hours a week.
Equity Pleading-One hour a week.
Conveyancing-On·e hour a week.
Federal Jurisprudence-Two hours a week.
Judge SEARS.
Professor HURD.
Professo r SMITH.
Judge GROSSCUP.
J.l;foot Court-Once a week. Members of the Faculty preside in
turn.
The student may take the work in moot court either in his
second or in his third year, or in both years, and will receive credit
for one term-hour for work satisfactorily done therein. All students
wishing to take this work must leave their names with the Secretary
on or before October 1st, in order that cases may be assigned and set
for hearing.
COURSES NOT COUNTED TOWARD A DEGREE.
Legal Ethics-Five lectures. Judge GROSSCUP.
Trade-Marks and Copyrig!zts-Six lectures. Mr. BOND.
MONDAY.
8:45 Real
Property (B).
9:45 Evidence.
- - -
ro:45
- - -
II :45
- - -
r:30 Torts.
- - -
2:30 Contracts.
3:45 Partnership.
4:45 Constitutional
Law.
SCHEDULE FOR FIRST HALF-YEAR.
TUESDAY. WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY,
Commercial Trusts. Commercial
Paper. Paper.
Trusts. Agency. Quasi-Contracts.
Quasi-Contracts.
Real Procedure. Real
Property (A). Property (A).
Pleading. Contracts. Contracts.
International Law. Partnership. Corporations.
Practice. ConsLtiatuwti. onal Practice.
FRIDAY.
Trusts.
Evidence.
Torts.
Pleading.
International
Law.
Constitutional
Law.
SATURDAY,
Real
Property (B).
Agency.
....
+
z
0
:;,::,
1-'3
:i::
t.:rJ
(/J
1-'3
t.:rJ
:;,::, z
cz::
t.:rJ
:;,::,
(/J
..,:
MONDAY.
8:45 Property (B).
- - -
9:45 Evidence.
ro:45
II :45
1:30 Torts.
2:30 Contracts.
3:45 Corporations.
4:45 Conveyancing.
SCHEDULE FOR SECOND HALF-YEAR.
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY , THURSDAY, FRIDAY,
Equity. Commercial Paper. Equity. Sales.
Sales. Sales. Evidence. Criminal Law.
.
Torts. PPreorpsoenrtayl. Torts. Carriers.
Carriers. Contracts. Contracts. Domestic
Relations.
Federal Corporations. Corporations. Federal
Jurisprudence. Jurisprudence.
Practice. Equity Pleading. Practice. Suretyship,
SATURDAY.
Equity.
Wills.
Real
Property (A).
""3 ::c
ti:l
t"' >
r:n
() ::c
0
0
!:"'
....
V\
l\'ORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY.
SYSTEM OF STUDY AND INSTRUCTION.
The modes of instruction are varied, and depend more or
less upon the individuality of the instructor and the character
of the particular course. The study of cases, while not employed
by all instructors as the basis of work, is particularly emphasized,
especially in the fundamental subjects of the law. The object
of the instruction given is not merely to secure familiarity with
the rules of law as actually enforced, but also to develop a
legal mind, to train the student in the art of legal reasoning,
and to cultivate the faculty of sound legal common sense; in
short, to prepare for the practical work of giving intelligent
legal advice upon actual situations laid before an attorney by
a client. "
It is desirable that the student should, if possible, devote
his time exclusively to his work in the law school. The constantly
increasing complexity of the law demands a thorough
acquaintance with legal theory, which can be obtained only in
a law school, and the work required of a student in this school
is amply sufficient to occupy all his time. The numerous
courts sitting in Chicago, and the vast amount of litigation
carried on here, afford ample opportunity to obtain familiarity
with all the kinds of practice. Students desiring to obtain
positions in lawyers' offices in Chicago will find a recommendation
from this school of great assistance. Such recommendations
are given only to graduates.
MOOT COURTS AND THESES.
1. Moot Courts. For the purpose of training in the
independent investigation of legal questions and in the
preparation of briefs, moot courts are held weekly during
the greater part of the year, in which the instructors preside
as judges, and the members of the class prepare briefs and
make oral arguments upon difficult cases given out beforehand.
Each member of the second and third year classes has
an opportunity during the year to take part as counsel in these
exercises.
\
'
I
THE LAW SCHOOL.
2. Theses. It is the desire of the Faculty to encourage
original research by students. Any member of the third-year
class may therefore obtain credit to an amount not exceeding
two term-hours by presenting a satisfactory thesis upon some
legal topic approved by a member of the Faculty. The thesis
must be presented on or before May 1st of the year in which
the student expects to gradua'te. It must be printed on typewriter
or otherwise, and is to be kept permanently in the
school.
PRIZES.
r. Th e Callagl,an Prize-A prize of fifty dollars in books, to be
selected fro1n their own publications, the gift of Messrs. Callaghan
and Company, of Chicago, will be awarded annually to the member
of the graduating class having the best record for the entire course.
In 18971 the Callaghan Prize, under slightly different conditions,
was awarded to Henry Clay Hall, B. S., Wesley, Ind.
2. The Tow le Prize-A prize of fifty dollars, the gift of Mr.
Henry Sargent Towle, of Chicago, will be awarded in 1898 to the
student having the best record for the first two years in the Law
School. This prize is open only to students who have taken the
regular work of the first and second years, and who are not candidates
for graduation in 1898.
In 1897, the Towle Prize, under slightly different conditions,
was awarded to Shirley Treadway High, A. B., of
Chicago.
3. The Encyclojmdia Prize-A prize of a set of the Encyclopredia
of Pleading and Practice, or a set of the first edition of the Encyclopredia
of Law, or a set of the second edition of the Encyclopredia
of Law, as the student may elect, the gift of The Edward Thompson
Company, of Northport, Long Island, is offered to the student
who shall write the best thesis on some subject assigned by
the Faculty.
Theses offered in competition for this prize cannot be
offered in competition for the prize offered by the Lawyers'
Co-operative Publishing Company, but any student may compete
for both prizes by writing two theses.
Theses offered in competition for the Encyclopredia Prize
must be presented at the office of the Law School on or before
May 1st.
18 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY.
In 1897, the Encyclopredia Prize was awarded to Joseph
Gilbert Sheldon, of Chicago.
4. The Lawyers' Co-operative Publishing Company's Prize-The
Lawyers' Co-operative Publishing Company, of Rochester, N . Y .,
offers as a prize for the best thesis upon the subject, "The Commerce
Clause of the Federal Constitution as Affected by the Police
Power of the States," a set, to July 11 18981 of the Lawyers' Reports
Annotated and Digest (value, $200).
Theses offered in competition for the Lawyers' Co-operative
Company's Prize must be presented at the office of the
Law School on or before May 1st.
LIBRARY FACILITIES.
By an arrangement which the School has made with the
Law Institute of Chicago, students are allowed free access to
its ample library, which is located in the Court House, only two
blocks distant from the School. This library contains over
30,000 volumes, including the reports and statutes of the
United States and all of the states in the Union, as well as the
English, Scotch and Irish reports and statutes, and a large collection
of treatises and digests. For the use of this library,
practicing lawyers, members of the Institute, pay $100 per
share, besides an annual assessment of from $10 to $12.
Students also have the benefit, without charge, of the large
Public Library of the city, which is located about the same distance
from the School, and contains 188,000 volumes. They
also have access, without charge, to the Newberry Library,
which contains 117 ,ooo volumes.
In addition to the library of the Law Institute, the Law
School has a library of its own, in which will be found the
reports and text-books most needed for reference. All current
American cases are to be found in the National Reporter
system, to which the School subscribes.
DEGREES.
All degrees are conferred at the generar University Commencement,
on which occasion all candidates for degrees are
THE LAW SCHOOL.
required to present themselves, the Oxford cap and gown being
worn as the official dress.
I. BACHELOR OF LAWS.
The degree of Bachelor of Laws will be conferred upon
students who complete the regular three years' course. But
(a) the candidate must have pursued at least one full year's
work as a resident student; and (b) the candidate must be
credited, on the books of the School, with satisfactory examinations
in courses of study amounting to ten hours a week for
three years, or sixty semester-hours in all. A student who entered
the School, however, at a time when its requirements for
a degree were less than at present, will receive his degree upon
complying with the requirements existing when he entered.
Four grades are given for work done. The grades are as
follows: A, excellent; B, satisfactory; C, unsatisfactory; D,
failure. Not more than ten semester-hours of grade C can be
counted by a student toward his degree without the unanimous
consent of the Faculty.
II. MASTER'S DEGREE .
The Master's Degree in Arts, Philosophy, Science or
Letters will be conferred under the following conditions:
A graduate of the College of Liberal Arts of this University,
or of some other in which the requirements for the
Bachelor's Degree in Arts, Philosophy, Science or Letters are
equivalent to the requirements for the same degree at this University,
may obtain the Master's degree at the same time with
the degree of Bachelor of Laws by pursuing, with the sanction
of the Faculty of Liberal Arts, advanced work in subjects
approved by that Faculty, and obtaining credit in such work to
the amount of twelve semester-hours. The courses of study
may, in part or entirely, deal with legal subjects; but courses
of legal study, in order to count for the degree, must be (a)
of an advanced nature, (b) not otherwise counted for the
degree of Bachelor of Laws, (c) pursued under the direction of
a member of the Faculty of the Law School. Students in law
intending to become candidates for the Master's degree must
20 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY.
register for the same in the College of Liberal Arts and in the
Law School on or before the first Monday in October of the
year in which they expect to graduate, and must pay the
diploma fee of ten dollars. The Master's degree is open
upon the same terms to graduates of the Law School who
register before the October next following the completion of
their professional course.
The following subjects have been approved by the Faculty
of Liberal Arts, and work therein may be counted for the Master's
degree : Constitutional Law, International Law, Administrative
Law, Roman Law, Jurisprudence, Leg al History.
FEES.
1. The tuition fee for regular students is one hundred
and five dollars a year, payable in three installments of thirtyfive
dollars each, October rst, January rnth, and April rst. A
rebate of five dollars is allowed to students who pay the entire
tuition in advance on October rst.
2 . Fees for special students are calculated on substantially
the above basis. For any course the fee is five dollars for each
hour per week of classroom-work for a half-year.
3. All fees for special courses are payable at the beginning
of each course.
4. Students taking other than the regular work of the
class pay fees as special students for the courses taken.
5. A Matriculation fee of five dollars is payable by all
students at the time of entering the School.
6. A fee of ten dollars is charged for a diploma conferring
the degree of Bachelor of Laws.
7. No reduction of fees is made to students who enter
the School after the beginning of the academic year.
8. Students are permitted to take only those courses for
which they pay tuition, but a student, while paying the regular
fee of one hundred and five dollars may attend without
charge any course for which he has paid in any preceding year.
9. No fees are refunded for any cause, but a student who
is prevented by sickness or otherwise from attending any
THE LAW SCHOOL. 21
course may attend the same course in any subsequent year
without charge.
ro. The registration of all students who fail to pay their
fees at the appointed time is canceled. Any student whose
registration is canceled is required to pay a fee of one dollar
for reinstatement.
r 1. Students may withdraw from the School at any time
by giving written notice to the Secretary. Upon the receipt
of such notice by the Secretary, the student will be released
from his obligation to pay installments of tuition becoming
due thereafter.
For further information relating to the school, address the
Secretary of the Faculty, Northwestern University Law School,
Masonic Temple, Chicago, Illinois.
THE LAW SCHOOL.
THIRD YEAR STUDENTS.
(Candidates for graduation in 1898.)
REGULAR STUDENTS.
(On account of the change of the course from two years to three
years, no regular students are candidates for graduation in 1898.)
SPECIAL STUDENTS.
Ayer, Fred Morgan,
Bassett, Wilbur Wheeler, Ph.B.,
University of Chicago .
Cordeal, John Francis,
Crossley, Frederic Beers,
Dray, Gail, B.S.,
Princeton University.
Frame, William Somerville, B.L.,
University of Wisconsin.
Gillette, Howard Frank,
Stone, Harry Wheeler, A .B.,
University of Chicago.
Vaill, James John,
Salt Lake City, Utah.
Chicago.
McCook, Neb.
Honesdale, Pa.
Chicago.
Waukesha, Wis.
Chicago,
Chicago,
Elgin.
SECOND YEAR STUDENTS.
(Candidates for graduation in 1899.)
REGULAR STUDENTS,
Abrahams, Joseph,
Ashcraft, Edwin Maurice, Jr.,
Barber, Cameron,
Beck, Herbert Merritt,
Bishop, James Franklin,
Browne, Vernelle Freeland,
Brucker, Ralph,
Cahn, Bertram Joseph, A.B.,
Yale University.
Campbell, David Tweedie,
Campbell, John Tyler, B.S.,
University of Chicago.
22
Chicago.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Fort Smith, Ark.
Evanston.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Chicag·o,
Chicago.
Chicago.
THE LAW SCHOOL. 23
Canfield, Horace, A.B., Elmhurst.
Harvard University.
Catherwood, Robert Karl Scott, B.S., Hoopeston.
Northwestern University.
Dunning, John Corliss, Ph.B., Plaquemine, La.
Cornell College.
Durfee, Frank Edward, C!ticago.
Elder, Charles Byrd, Chicago.
Feeney, Barnard Cyril, Rochester, Minn.
Fetzer, William Ray, Leonore.
Frahm, Hattie Belle, Tuscola.
Heideman, Edwin Fred, Elmhurst.
Herbst, Charles Frederick, Jr., Wapakoneta, Ohio.
Kilgour, William, Kenilworth.
King, Charles Homer, A.B., Wa11kegan.
Northwestern University.
Koepke, Charles A lbert, Chicago.
Kropf, Richard Edward, A .B., Richland, Kan.
Washburn College.
Lasker, Isidor, Chicago.
Laughlin, Daniel Francis, Chicago.
Lee, John Henry Sheldon, A.B., fVaukegan.
Harvard University.
Manierre, George Willard, Chicago.
Manley, Benjamin Franklin, Alden.
M0cCarthy, William Daniel, Ponca, N eb.
McConahey, James McConnell, B.S.,
Washington and Jefferson College.
Pittsburg, Pa.
Miller, William Southworth, A.B.,
Yale University.
Chicago.
Miner, Fred Martin, Chicago.
Mitchell, Francis Joseph Ross, A.B., Evanston.
Northwestern University.
Moss, David Hickman, Jr., Paris, Mo .
Ohlerich, Albert Frederick William, Elmhurst.
Oswald, Hugo Edmund, Chicago.
Pearsons, Harry Putnam, A.B., Evanston.
,. Northwestern University. Pell, William John, B.S., Oak Park.
Carleton College.
Petteys, John Gordon, C1ticago.
Rawson, Marie L., Princeton.
Ross, Carl Abraham, A.B., Lower Waterford, Vt.
Harvard University.
Rydell, Oscar Ferdinand, Chicago.
Seass, Samuel Lucas, Champaign,
Sheller, William, A.B., Lanark.
Northwestern University.
Sheppard, Robert Loring, Ph.B.,
Yale University.
Evanston,
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY.
Silverthorne, George Morrill,
Stelck, Henry,
Stephens, Redmond Davis, A.B.,
Harvard University.
Vaughan, John Franklin,
Vennum, Thomas Gaylord, A.B.,
Yale University.
Wales, Henry Whitwell, Jr., Ph.B.
University of Chicago.
Walton, Frank Richmond,
Wemple, Charles Francis, B.S.,
lllinois College.
Whitlock, Royal Joseph, Ph.B.,
Northwestern University.
·worthy, Sidney \Vindsor,
SPECIAL STUDENTS.
Brown, James Scott, A.B.,
University of Chicago.
Cashel, John Andrew,
Charnley, Douglas, A.B.,
Yale University.
Eckles, Asa, A.B.,
Allegheny College.
Fish, Clarence Everett, Ph.B.,
University of Chicago.
Gwin, James Madison, Ph.B.,
University of Chicago.
Holbrook, Evans, A.B.,
Stanford University.
Lackner, Edgar Cranfield, Ph.B.,
University of Chicago.
Martin, Edward Hiram Storms, Ph.B.,
University of Michigan.
McCornack, Walter Edwin, B.S.,
Dartmouth College.
Pearson, Harold Peter,
Rice, Elbridge Washburn, Ph.B.,
University of Chicago.
Ridenour, Barbara Emeline,
Tallman, Jesse Milton, B.S.,
Cornell College.
Tilton, Floyd James,
Yaple, Edward Lewis, B.S.,
Kalamazoo College and University of Chicago.
Chicago.
Rock Island.
Chicag·o.
Chicago.
Watseka.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Waverly.
Evanston.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Arcadia, Wis.
Chicago.
Harthegig, Pa.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Onawa, Ia.
Aurora.
Chicago.
Cl11cago.
Ch1c,71;·0.
Pontiac.
India1:apolis, Ind.
Cama,;che, Ia.
Rochelle.
.lviendon, Mich.
THE LAW SCHOOL.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS.
(Candidates for graduation in 1900.)
Ayer, Alvin Clarence,
Bauman, Emanuel,
Bibo, Max Sholem,
REGULAR STUDENTS.
Borgmeier, Adolph John,
Catlin, Louis Robert,
Clark, Russell Porter,
Cofer,John Coombs,
Condee, Ralph Waterbury,
Fegtley, Samuel Marks, Ph.B.,
Northwestern University.
Ford, John \Vilkes, Jr.,
Gearon, John Ambrose, A.B.,
Creighton University.
Goodman, Charles Augustus, A.B.,
University of Chicago.
Gray, Charles Harry,
Huestis, Isaac Jerome,
Irwin, Royal Wentworth,
Jackson, David Henry, A.B.,
Lake Forest University.
Johnston, Frank H.,
Jones, Robert Alexander,
King, Robert Allen,
King, William Joseph, A.B.,
St. Mary's College,
Lehmann, Edward John,
Lough, Clarence Roland,
Lutz, Robert Ingersoll,
Maclay, Otis Hardy, B.S.,
Northwestern University.
Marsh, Edwin Franklin,
McKinnie, Ralph Renwick,
McNett, Willard Nelson,
Meloy, Robert Bingham, A.B.,
University of Chicago.
Morley, Walter Kelley,
Napheys, Horace Kisterbock,
Neff, George,
Ordway, Charles Hiram,
Patterson, Stewart, A,B.,
Yale University.
Pope, Benjamin Helm,
Chicago.
Chicago.
Paris.
Chicago.
Sugar Grove.
New Haven, Conn.
Arcola.
Chicago.
Nevada, Ia.
1,Vaukegan.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Lake Forest.
Clzicago.
Chatham.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Gardner.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Evanston.
Cary.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Chicago.
Fond du Lac, Wis.
Chicago.
Columbus, Ohio.
25
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY.
Raymond, Jules Norton, B.S.,
Northern Indiana Normal College.
Rodenberg, Albert David, A.B.,
Central Wesleyan College.
Rothschild, Isaac Solomon, Ph.B.,
University of Chicago.
Savage, John Howard,
Schaffner, Walter,
Senseman, Thomas Lueders,
Slade, James Bonyman,
Smith, Milton Alexander,
Thomasson, Leonard,
Thompson, Benjamin Franklin Carver, A.B.,
Yale University.
Thompson, Robert William,
Timke, Julius Jacob,
Tubbs, George Shirley,
Tyng, Philip Brotherson,
Wallace, Charles Edward,
Whitney, Fred Brown, A.B.,
Williams College.
Wing, Edwin Willits,
Young, Nelson Lyman,
DeGroff, Frank,
Goetz, Albert,
SPECIAL STUDENTS.
Turner, Delos W.,
Wheeler, Hamilton Harry,
Evanston.
Decatur.
C!zicago.
Marley.
Clzicago.
Burlington, Ia.
David City, Neb.
Clzicago.
Clzicago.
C!ticago.
C!ticago.
Sout!t Elmhurst.
Kirkwood.
Peoria.
C!ticago.
Waukegan.
Elgin.
C!ticago.
C!ticag·o.
C!ticago.
Vicksburg, Mic!t.
Kankakee.
SPECIAL STUDENTS.
(Not candidates for a degree.)
Earle, George,
Earle, William,
Kelley, Maud Marshall,
Ryan, Matthew James,
Turner, Frank,
C!ticago.
C!ticago.
C!ticago.
Escanaba, Mic!t.
C!ticago.
APPENDIX.
ADMISSION TO THE BAR IN ILLINOIS.
Inquiries in regard to admission to the bar in Illinois should be
addressed to Julius Rosenthal, Esq., 1007 Fort Dearborn Bldg., Chicago,
Ill.
The following rules now govern admission to the bar in
Illinois (Supreme Court of Illinois, Rule 39):
RULE 39. There shall be appointed by this court a State Board
- of Law Examiners, to consist of five members of the bar of at least
five years' standing-one from each Appellate Court district and one
from the State at large-to hold, regulate, supervise, and control
examinations for admission to the bar, and to examine and report
upon the qualifications of applicants for admission, based upon admission
to the bar in another State or foreign country . Every
application to this court for admission to the bar shall be made in
term time, by motion in open court, based upon a report of said
Board of Law Examiners. Each examiner shall act as a member of
such board for a term of three years, except under the first appointment,
which shall be for a term of one year for one, two years for
two, and three years for the remaining two of said examiners, and
until the appointment of their successors.
Examinations shall be conducted by written or printed interrogatories,
in whole or in part, and to be as nearly as possible
uniform throughout the State; to be held at Ottawa on the first
Tuesday of March; at Chicago the first Tuesday of May; at Springfield
the first Tuesday of September, and at Mt. Vernon on the first
Tuesday of December, in each year. Such examinations shall be
held by the examiners as a body, a majority of whom shall constitute
a quorum .
Each applicant for admission must sustain a satisfactory examination
upon the law of real and personal property, personal rights,
contracts, evidence, common law and equity pleading, partnerships,
bailments, negotiable instruments, principal and agent, principal and
surety, domestic relations, wills, corporations, equity jurisprudence,
27
28 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY,
criminal law, and upon the principles of the constitutions of the
State and of the United States, and legal ethics.
The board shall certify_ to this court every person who shall
pass a satisfactory examination, provided such person shall have in
other respects complied with the rules regulating the licensing of
attorneys, which fact shall be determined by said board before the
examination. If an applicant, on examination, should be rejected,
he shall not again be admitted to an examination within six months
from the date of such rejection, and shall file with the board proof
that he has studied law for six months subsequent to the prior
examination.
Each applicant for admission to the bar, whether upon examination
or admission in another State or foreign country, shall pay
to said board, in advance, a fee of ten dollars, and shall present his
affidavit, or that of some other reputable person for him, that he is
of the age of twenty-one years or above, a resident of this State and
a citizen of the United States, or has declared his intention of becoming
a citizen thereof; also, a certified transcript of the record
from a court of record of this State showing that the applicant is a
person of good moral character, which transcript shall show that at
least two reputable members of the bar practicing in the court in
which the record is made, and whose names shall be given,appeared
before said court and testified that the applicant was a reputable
person and of good moral character.
Every applicant, except those who apply for admission by virtue
of admission in another State or foreign country, shall present to
the Board of Law Examiners, satisfactory proof, in writing, by
examination or otherwise, as the board may direct, that he has had
a preliminary general education equivalent to that of a graduate of
a high school in this State, and has pursued for the period of three
years, during at least thirty-six weeks in each year, a course of law
studies covering the subjects above enumerated, naming the law
books studied, and that such law studies have been pursued in an
established law school considered by the board to be in good standing,
or under the tuition of one or more licensed lawyers; and that
the applicant, if studying under such tuition, has submitted to regular
and satisfactory examinations by such lawyer or lawyers during
said period, upon each subject. Such proof shall consist of the
affidavit of the applicant and the certificate of the Secretary or one of
the professors of the law school, showing personal attendance at
such law school, or the certificate or certificates. of the lawyer or
lawyers under whose tuition such studies have been pursued; or if,
in consequence of the death or absence of such lawyer or lawyers,
his or their certificate cannot be procured, its place may be supplied
THE LAW SCHOOL.
by the affidavit of any credible witness having knowledge of the
facts. The course of study may be made up by attendance upon a
law school for a portion of the time and under the direction and
supervision of one or more lawyers for the remainder of the time.
The papers produced to the board of examiners in conformity
with the foregoing rules shall not be deemed conclusive evidence of
the facts therein stated, and if it shall come to the knowledge of said
board that any person who has presented to said board such transcript,
has imposed upon the court in which the record is made and
is not in fact a person of good moral character, or that any certificate
or affidavit is untrue, said board shall, after full investigation, certify
their findings in that respect, together with the reasons therefor, to
this court, with their certificate of qualification. Any fraudulent act
or representation by an applicant in connection with his application
for examination or admission shall be sufficient cause for the withholding
of the license by this court, or for its revocation after it has
been issued.
Every applicant for admission to the bar upon a license or other
voucher showing his admission as an attorney-at-law in another
State or foreign country,-must, in addition to the other proofs above
required, present to the board such license duly certified, or a copy
of the record of the court showing his admission to the bar, duly
proved, as required by law for the authentication of the records of
courts of sister states when offered in evidence in the courts of this
State. Such license or voucher must confer the right to practice in
the highest courts in such State or foreign country. Such applicant
shall be admitted upon such license or voucher without examination
by the board, if it appears to the court, by certificate of said board,
that in the State or country in which the license was issued the
requirements for admission to the bar were equal to those prescribed
in this State, or that the applicant has been engaged in active practice
for a period of five years in courts of record under such license.
The board shall certify to this court persons entitled to admission
by virtue of such admission to the bar in such other State or foreign
country.
RULES ADOPTED BY THE STATE BOARD OF LAW EXAMINERS,
JANUARY 12, 1898.
RULE r. All applications should be on the printed forms prescribed
by the board of examiners, and filed with the Secretary of
the board at least three weeks before the stated meeting of the board
at which the applicant intends to apply, and must be accompanied
by all the proofs required by the rules of the Supreme Cou-rt and
those of this board, on the forms prescribed by this board, wherever
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY.
applicable; from all of which it must appear affirmatively and spe·
cifically that all the preliminary conditions prescribed by said rules
have been complied with. The fee of ten dollars prescribed by the
Supreme Court must be paid at the same time.
RULE 2. Each applicant for admission, upon examination,
shall present with his application satisfactory proof in
writing that he has had a preliminary general education equivalent
to that of a graduate of a high school in this· State. A
three years' English course, consisting of Algepra, Geometry,
Ancient History, Physiology, Rhetoric, Physics, and Physical
Geography, each one year; Botany and Bookkeeping, one
year; Media!val and Modern History, with special reference to
English and American History, one year; English and Amer·
ican Literature, one year; and Zoology and English Composition,
one year, will be accepted as such equivalent.
In case of the omission by the applicant of any one or
more of such studies, except English · and American History
and Literature, the equivalent of such omitted study or studies,
in any science, or in any classical or modern language (Latin
being especially recommended), will be accepted in lieu of
such omitted study or studies.
The proof required by this rule that the applicant has satisfactorily purs•u ed the said studies or their equivalents, for
the requisite periods, may be by either one or more of the
following instruments:
r. The diploma of any University or College in good
standing; or
2. The diploma of a high school in this State, where such
diploma designates the several studies pursued and the length
of time devoted to each; or
3. The diploma of a high school in this State, accom·
panied with the certificate of the principal of such school,
designating the several studies pursued, and the length of
time devoted to each; or
4. The affidavit of a principal of a high school in this State,
or other high school teacher or teachers under whom the
applicant has studied ( or, in case of the death or absence of
THE LAW SCHOOL.
such principal or teacher, then the affidavit of any credible
witness or witnesses having knowledge of the facts), designating
the several studies pursued, the length of time devoted to
each, and as nearly as possible, the applicant's degree of proficiency
in each study; or
5. The affidavit of the principal of a high school of this
State, or of a superintendent of schools having a high school
under his supervision, showing his special examination of the
applicant for the purpose of an application for admission to
the bar, stating the date and place of examination and the
time consumed therein, and giving the true and just grade or
proficiency shown by such applicant in each study, on a scale
of 100; or
6. The diploma of any accredited school, not in Illinois,
whose graduates are admitted on a diploma to the freshman
class of any University or College, in good standing, in the
State or country in which such school is located; such fact to
be evidenced by the certificate of the President or Secretary of ·
such University or College, under the corporate seal of the
institution; or
7. The certificate of the President or Secretary of any
University or College in good standing, under the seal of the
institution, that the applicant has been admitted to the freshman
or any higher class of such institution, without conditions,
or upon conditions which had since been complied with.
RULE 3. Every applicant for admission to the bar of this State,
by virtue of admission in another State or foreign country, must
present with his application either-
!. A copy of the rules relating to admissions to the bar, of the
court by which he was admitted, in force at the time of his admission,
from which it shall appear that in the State or country in which
he was admitted the requirements for admission to the bar were then
equal to those now prescribed in this State, which copy must be
properly certified under the seal of the court as a full and correct
copy of the rules in force at the date of such admission; or
z. The certificate or certificates of one or more judges of a court
or courts of record in the State in which he was admitted, showing
affirmatively and specifically that the applicant has been engaged in
active practice for a period of five years in said court or courts under
32 NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY.
the license granted him by the --- Court in said State, and the
time or times when he was so engaged. The signature of each
judge so certifying must be certified by the clerk of the court under
the seal of the court.
If, in consequence of the death or absence of any judge or judges
such certificate cannot be procured, its place may be supplied by the
certificate of the clerk of the court in which the applicant practiced,
under the seal of the court, if such clerk has personal knowledge of
the facts, and so certifies; or by the affidavits of two or more reputable
lawyers, having such personal knowledge, setting forth the facts
· specifically as to when and where and in what courts and for what
period of time the applicant so practiced, and their means of information;
and the officer before whom such affidavit is taken must
certify that the affiants are reputable lawyers, in good standing at
the bar.
RULE 4. All affidavits required by Rule 39 of the Supreme Court,
or by these rules, must be made before an officer authorized to administer
oaths and having an official seal, and attested by his official
seal; or, if made before an officer not having an official seal, his
signature and official position must be properly certified to by the
proper officer having such seal.
Rule 5. An established law school to be considered in good
standing must faithfully teach the several branches of law specified
in Rule 39 of the Supreme Court, and must require recitations averaging
ten hours or more each week.

“Northwestern University Law School Circular of Information for 1898-99,” PLRC Collections, accessed August 10, 2020, http://plrccollections.org/items/show/353.